Thursday, 23 March 2017

Book Catch-up: Reading Challenge

I have fallen way behind with posts about the Reading Challenge. Using this challenge has proved useful to push me into reading beyond my usual fare of children's books, biography and the occasional novel.

Anyway, some highlights from my reading. I have put the category of book in brackets. The full list is found at the page called Books read 2017.

These Strange Ashes (By or about a missionary) This book by Elizabeth Elliot was recommended by a friend. Elizabeth Elliot tells the story of her first year as a missionary, how everything went wrong and what God brought out of this.

Jonathan Edwards (Book less than 100 pages) This book is from Simonetta Carr's lovely series of picture books. They aren't cheap but everyone that I have read has been well worth reading. The books have maps, timelines and pictures. The book about Jonathan Edwards ends with a great quote from a letter to his daughter. I usually don't mind whether I read books or ebooks but these are proper books that are beautifully produced and even feel good. Highly recommended.

God's Smuggler (Choice) Another book recommended by a friend. An amazing story of God's provision and how Bibles got into the former Soviet block.

A guide to Christian living (Christian living) This is a chapter from John Calvin's Institutes in book form. It is short and surprisingly readable.

I've just ventured into audiobooks via Librivox. My first try was a bit of a fail. Augustine's Confessions was just too difficult. My second try was John Buchan's Mr Standfast which was better but much harder to follow than in print. Has anyone else found that they can only manage easy books on audio?

Current reading and challenges
As usual there are several books on the go

  • Market day of the Soul (Theology)is about how the Lord's Day was kept during the years 1532 to 1700. This book isn't quite what I had thought. My aim had been to read a book about the Biblical principles for keeping the Lord's Day so that I could then work out practical details. It is really more historical which is interesting but I still need to read a book about principles. I do wish that the old spelling had been updated.
  • The Nation's Favourite Poems (Poetry). A fascinating read and has forced me to read some famous poems that I haven't read before. I have been surprised by the world view of some famous poets and have enjoyed the introduction to others.
  • The Zookeeper's Wife (New York Times best seller) This is a true story of how the Zookeeper of Warsaw Zoo and his wife sheltered Jews during the Second World War. A fascinating and easy read-so far.
Challenges-OK, I have got stuck on a few books and this is why.
  • Holy War (recommended by your pastor). This is on the church recommended list. Why did I get stuck? I lent it to someone else in the middle of reading it which probably wasn't clever.  Anyway, it has been returned so hopefully, I can get reading again soon.
  • Catastrophe: Europe goes to war 1914 (history). I like this book but it isn't the sort of book to read just before midnight or while the vegetables are cooking or in ten minutes after lunch. I'm hoping to finish it but it might need to wait until my summer holiday.
  • John Calvin on Habakkuk, Zephaniah and Haggai.(commentary) This has been a challenge for similar reasons. It requires time and proper concentration. I had a slot for it first thing in the morning but have been thrown by the difference in length of the sections.

As always, I love book recommendations and would be delighted to have any advice on audio books and managing longer books.

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  1. Thank you!! for sharing your reading journey ( off to check out a few titles you've mentioned). With librivox :-) I'd suggest starting with a really good narrator, ie: Karen Savage, Mark Smith; and, with other audiobooks via library or audible I purposely aim for a narrator that appeals. (Jane Austen's works are a good example, so many narrators to choose from.) If I can't get a good narrator then I'd rather try to read the book myself. Long! books become intentional sip reads, but must be laying handy for me to pick up at random - or if I elect to switch them to audio that becomes my 'working time' (cleaning/gardening) listen. As the children have become older it's amazing what I can now listen to with them around; I think you're doing amazingly well with your reading achievements!

    1. Thank you for the encouragement. The suggestions for Librivox narrators are really helpful. "Sip read"-yes, that is a really descriptive term and something that I need to work at. I tend to be a gulp reader!